Our Vision

Bringing light to the science of cognition research.

The mission of the LuMind Research Down Syndrome Foundation is to stimulate biomedical research that will accelerate the development of treatments to significantly improve cognition, including memory, learning and speech, for individuals with Down Syndrome.

Our Approach  Learn More

How Your Donation Helps

Cognition research offers opportunities for people of all ages with Down syndrome. Your support is essential to finding safe, effective therapies to improve cognition and delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease within the Ds community. Your gift is crucial to furthering these breakthroughs.

By the Numbers

Down syndrome in our community and the world.

US Statistics

250,000 - 400,000

The number persons with Down syndrome in the US

Worldwide Numbers

7,000,000

Estimated number of people with Down syndrome worldwide

Dollars per person

$9

The amount of research dollars per diagnosed person with Down syndrome

LuMind RDS News

Response to the Roche Clinical Trial for CLEMATIS

A response from LuMind Research Down Syndrome President and CEO Carolyn Cronin regarding the end of the Roche Clinical Trial for CLEMATIS. Hello friends, Like you we were disappointed to learn about the end of Roche Clinical Trial for CLEMATIS, the Phase II study investigating the efficacy and safety of basmisanil (RG1662) in adults and …

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Ann & Dee’s Memorial 24 Hour Relay Run for Research

Looking for a FUN way to raise money for LuMind Research Down Syndrome Foundation without all the stress of planning a complicated event or gala? Take a look at the Ann & Dee’s Memorial 24 Hour Relay Run for Research! Lisa Arnoa and Matt MacDougall came up with the idea for the the 24 Hour Relay Run for Research …

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What people are saying about us.

“I never thought I would be in a position to say, ‘We are going to take therapies forward to directly treat Down syndrome.’ Now I think that is the case. We really are in the early stages of a revolution in understanding the basis for many of the features that occur in Down syndrome.”

Dr. Roger Reeves, Johns Hopkins