Live webinar with Dr. Tarik Haydar and Dr. Nadine Aziz

When:
March 20, 2018 @ 3:00 pm
2018-03-20T15:00:00-04:00
2018-03-20T15:15:00-04:00
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Marly Chevrette
508-630-2179

 

 Dr. Tarik Haydar and Dr. Nadine Aziz
from the Boston University School of Medicine

Tuesday, March 20, 2018
3 p.m. EDT | 2 p.m. CDT | 12 p.m. MDT | 12 p.m. PDT

Join LuMind RDS with Dr. Tarik Haydar and Dr. Nadine Aziz to learn more about what is going on in the brain’s white matter, how it affects speed, signaling and processing in the brain. You will hear the results of recent research that demonstrates it matters in Down syndrome and may be a potential target to improve the brain circuitry that affect the speed and rate of processing information.

L-R: Dr. Nadine Aziz and Dr. Tarik Haydar

Dr. Tarik Haydar and Dr. Nadine Aziz will provide the background of white matter, the differences found with Down syndrome and present their research path and methodology followed by a Questions and Answers session.

If you can’t join us, register today and receive a link to the recording after the live webinar!

 

 

Webinar description:

Join us to learn what is going on in your white matter, how it affects speed, signaling and processing in the brain, and the results of recent research that demonstrates it matters in Down syndrome and may be a potential target to improve the brain circuitry that affect the speed and rate of processing information. Dr. Tarik Haydar and Dr. Nadine Aziz will provide the background of white matter, the differences found with Down syndrome and present their research path and methodology followed by a Questions and Answers session.

About Dr. Tarik Haydar:

For the past 20 years, Dr. Haydar has dedicated himself to advancing our understanding of Down syndrome. As a PhD student at the University of Maryland, he worked with Dr. Bruce Krueger on brain development in the Ts16 mouse, the first mouse model of Down syndrome in 1997. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship on cellular/molecular mechanisms of brain development at Yale University, working with Dr. Pasko Rakic.

Dr. Haydar returned to Down syndrome research in 2002 when he established an independent laboratory at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC. Studying brain development of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome, he determined that two triplicated genes (Olig1 and Olig2) may play a role in changing the balance of excitation and inhibition in the brains of people with Down syndrome. In 2010, Dr. Haydar moved to Boston University, where he is currently investigating the causes of changes in white matter production in the central nervous system in Down syndrome.

About Dr. Nadine Aziz:

Dr. Aziz is a postdoctoral associate at Boston University School of Medicine working in Dr. Haydar’s lab. She is interested in characterizing the determinants of proper central nervous system development and function during gestation. Specifically, She studies the etiology of atypical central nervous system development and its impact on cognition and motor function in Down syndrome. She is involved in multiple interrelated projects utilizing mouse models of Down syndrome.

Dr. Haydar’s research is funded by the NIH (NINDS and NICHD).